7-Day High-Protein Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan for High Blood Pressure, Created by a Dietitian
Health & Fitness

7-Day High-Protein Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan for High Blood Pressure, Created by a Dietitian

If you have high blood pressure or are at risk of developing high blood pressure, you may want to follow the Mediterranean diet. Due to its emphasis on nutrient-rich fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats, this popular way of eating is linked to many health benefits, including improved heart health and lower blood pressure. In this 7-day Mediterranean meal plan, we map out a week of meals and snacks tailored to help improve blood pressure. While we emphasize plenty of fresh produce, we don’t skimp on protein. You’ll find a wide variety of protein sources spread throughout each day to help keep you full and provide lasting energy. If you have high blood pressure or are simply looking to up your nutrition, this meal plan can help. 

How We Create Meal Plans

Registered dietitians thoughtfully create EatingWell’s meal plans to be easy-to-follow and delicious. Each meal plan meets specific parameters depending on the health condition and/or lifestyle goal it is targeting and is analyzed for accuracy using the nutrition database, ESHA Food Processor. As nutritional needs differ from person to person, we encourage you to use these plans as inspiration and adjust as you see fit.

Why This Meal Plan Is Great for You

The American Heart Association endorses the Mediterranean diet as a nutritious way of eating that aligns with their recommendation for a heart-healthy eating pattern. The diet doesn’t set rigid rules, which makes it easier to adopt as a lifestyle compared to stricter plans. It includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes as well as poultry, fish, dairy and nuts. It limits added sugars, refined grains and highly processed meats. 

To support healthy blood pressure, this meal plan provides at least 28 grams of heart-healthy fiber, caps sodium at 1,500mg per day and limits saturated fat to no more than 12 grams per day, with a higher cap of 17 grams of saturated fat on days that include fatty fish, like salmon. Each day includes at least 80 grams of protein, with most days coming in much higher. 

Because weight loss may help improve blood pressure in some people, we set this plan at 1,500 calories per day, which is a level where many people will experience weight loss. For those with other calorie needs, we also included modifications for 1,200 and 2,000 calories per day. 

Frequently Asked Questions


  • ​​Is it OK to mix and match meals if there is one I do not like?

    Yes! This meal plan is meant to serve as a framework for a healthy eating plan for high blood pressure. It doesn’t need to be followed exactly to reap the benefits. When choosing recipes, we made sure to check calories, saturated fat and sodium so they would fit within the total calorie goal of 1,500 calories per day and be within our saturated fat and sodium limits. If you’re making a recipe swap, it may be helpful to choose a recipe with similar calories, saturated fat and sodium levels. For more inspiration, check out all of our Mediterranean recipes, including 20+ High-Protein Mediterranean Diet Dinners for Better Heart Health.


  • Can I eat the same breakfast or lunch every day?

    Definitely, it’s fine to eat the same breakfast or lunch every day. Each breakfast ranges from 295 to 350 calories while each lunch spans 344 to 419 calories. These ranges are fairly close, though if you’re closely monitoring your calories or other nutrients, like protein, you may want to adjust a snack or two. 


  • Can the Mediterranean diet help high blood pressure?

    Yes, the Mediterranean diet can help improve high blood pressure.

Health Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet:

The Mediterranean diet is linked to many health benefits, which is partly why it continues to be so popular. Research links the Mediterranean diet to improved heart health, a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, improved cognitive function and even a reduced risk of certain cancers. One great aspect of this healthy eating style is that it’s flexible. The idea is to eat the Mediterranean way more often than not by aiming to fill up your plate with veggies, include plenty of fish, nuts and legumes and prioritize whole grains. Eating the occasional sweet, refined grain or processed meat won’t derail your health efforts. 

Mediterranean Diet Foods to Focus On

  • Whole grains
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Vegetables
  • Fruit
  • Unsaturated fats, like olive oil
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Fish
  • Poultry
  • Eggs
  • Dairy
  • Herbs and spices

How to Meal-Prep Your Week of Meals

  1. Make High-Protein Strawberry & Peanut Butter Overnight Oats to have for breakfast on days 2 through 4.
  2. Prepare Sweet Potato, Kale & Chicken Salad with Peanut Dressing to have for lunch on days 2 through 5. 
  3. Make Whipped Cottage Cheese to have as a snack throughout the week.

Day 1

Jen Causey

Breakfast (295 calories)

A.M. Snack (206 calories)

  • ¼ cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds

Lunch (344 calories)

P.M. Snack (193 calories)

  • 1 (5.3-oz.) container nonfat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • ½ cup strawberries
  • 2 Tbsp. chopped slivered almonds

Dinner (450 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,488 calories, 82g fat, 14g saturated fat, 96g protein, 104g carbohydrate, 31g fiber, 1,499mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 plum and omit slivered almonds and reduce to ¼ cup sliced strawberries at P.M. snack.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 serving Raspberry-Kefir Power Smoothie to breakfast, 1 medium orange to lunch and 1 serving Apple with Cinnamon Almond Butter as an evening snack.

Day 2

Photographer: Stacy k. Allen, Props: Christina Brockman, Food Stylist: Jennifer Wendorf


Breakfast (333 calories)

A.M. Snack (131 calories)

Lunch (393 calories)

P.M. Snack (60 calories)

Dinner (473 calories)

Evening Snack (95 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,485 calories, 44g fat, 8g saturated fat, 84g protein,194g carbohydrate, 31g fiber, 1,456mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 plum, omit quinoa at dinner and omit evening snack. 

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 cup low-fat plain kefir to breakfast, ¼ cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to A.M. snack and 2 Tbsp. almond butter to evening snack.

Day 3

Photographer: Rachel Marek, Food stylist: Holly Dreesman, Prop stylist: Sue Mitchell


Breakfast (333 calories)

A.M. Snack (264 calories)

  • 1 (5.3-oz.) container nonfat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • 1 medium peach
  • 3 Tbsp. chopped slivered almonds

Lunch (393 calories)

P.M. Snack (60 calories)

Dinner (453 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,502 calories, 64g fat, 9g saturated fat, 91g protein, 147g carbohydrate, 29g fiber, 1,385mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to ¼ cup blueberries and omit Whipped Cottage Cheese at P.M. snack.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 cup low-fat plain kefir to breakfast, ¼ cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to P.M. snack and 1 serving Apple with Cinnamon Almond Butter as an evening snack.

Day 4

Jacob Fox

Breakfast (333 calories)

A.M. Snack (131 calories)

Lunch (393 calories)

P.M. Snack (60 calories)

Dinner (478 calories)

Evening Snack (95 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,490 calories, 50g fat, 7g saturated fat, 81g protein, 185g carbohydrate, 28g fiber, 1,062mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 plum, change dinner to 1 serving Creamy Pesto Shrimp with Gnocchi & Peas and omit evening snack.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 cup low-fat plain kefir to breakfast, ¼ cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to A.M. snack and 2 Tbsp. almond butter to evening snack.

Day 5

Photography: Rachel Marek, Food Stylist: Annie Probst


Breakfast (350 calories)

  • 1 cup nonfat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds
  • ½ cup cherries (fresh or thawed from frozen)

A.M. Snack (291 calories)

  • 1 medium apple
  • 2 Tbsp. almond butter

Lunch (393 calories)

P.M. Snack (60 calories)

Dinner (419 calories)

Meal-Prep Tip: Reserve two servings Slow-Cooker Chicken & Brown Rice with Roasted Corn & Black Beans to have for lunch on days 6 and 7.

Daily Totals: 1,513 calories, 57g fat, 8g saturated fat, 104g protein, 157g carbohydrate, 31g fiber, 1,089mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Omit slivered almonds at breakfast and almond butter at A.M. snack.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 serving Peanut Butter & Chia Berry Jam English Muffin to breakfast, 1 medium banana to lunch and 1 large pear as an evening snack.

Day 6

Photographer: Greg DuPree, Food Stylist: Ali Ramee Prop Stylist: Christine Keely

Breakfast (350 calories)

  • 1 cup nonfat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds
  • ½ cup cherries (fresh or thawed from frozen)

A.M. Snack (95 calories)

Lunch (419 calories)

P.M. Snack (119 calories)

  • 1 cup sliced cucumber
  • ¼ cup hummus

Dinner (509 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,492 calories, 57g fat, 9g saturated fat, 101g protein, 157g carbohydrate, 32g fiber, 1,259mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Omit slivered almonds at breakfast, change A.M. snack to 1 plum and omit hummus at P.M. snack.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 serving Peanut Butter & Chia Berry Jam English Muffin to breakfast, 2 Tbsp. almond butter to A.M. snack and have 1 medium orange as an evening snack. 

Day 7

Charlotte & Johnny Autry

Breakfast (295 calories)

A.M. Snack (206 calories)

  • ¼ cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds

Lunch (419 calories)

P.M. Snack (150 calories)

  • 1 (5.3-oz.) container nonfat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • 1 cup blackberries

Dinner (432 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,503 calories, 64g fat, 10g saturated fat, 113g protein, 125g carbohydrate, 32g fiber, 1,465mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to ½ cup blueberries and change P.M. snack to 1 clementine.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 serving Peanut Butter & Chia Berry Jam English Muffin to breakfast, 1 medium banana to A.M. snack and 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds to P.M. snack.